Long long way to go

I hate writing Description in Chinese. Hate it even more in English. So just let the blog speaks itself. :P
~ Monday, September 1 ~
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(Source: batsori)


4,609 notes
reblogged via discowing
~ Thursday, August 14 ~
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humansofnewyork:

"My grandmother remembers the Arab world much differently than people view it today. She remembers a place known for its music, innovation, and intellectual abilities. I may be naive, but I want to help work toward unity in the Arab world— both between our countries and within our countries— so that we can get back to that place again." (Amman, Jordan)

humansofnewyork:

"My grandmother remembers the Arab world much differently than people view it today. She remembers a place known for its music, innovation, and intellectual abilities. I may be naive, but I want to help work toward unity in the Arab world— both between our countries and within our countries— so that we can get back to that place again." (Amman, Jordan)


6,066 notes
reblogged via humansofnewyork
~ Friday, July 11 ~
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humansofnewyork:

"I’m 33 and I still work as a bartender. To make it worse, my brother is a world renowned chemist. So when my father talks to people at weddings, he says: ‘My son just got a million dollar grant. And my daughter lives in New York.’ The thing is, I used to be such an overachiever. I skipped the last two years of high school. I got a full ride to college, but ended up dropping out. I don’t know what happened. I keep telling myself I’m saving up to go back to school, but I don’t have any savings. I don’t know, I just feel very lame all the time. Don’t make me sound too lame."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m 33 and I still work as a bartender. To make it worse, my brother is a world renowned chemist. So when my father talks to people at weddings, he says: ‘My son just got a million dollar grant. And my daughter lives in New York.’ The thing is, I used to be such an overachiever. I skipped the last two years of high school. I got a full ride to college, but ended up dropping out. I don’t know what happened. I keep telling myself I’m saving up to go back to school, but I don’t have any savings. I don’t know, I just feel very lame all the time. Don’t make me sound too lame."


10,300 notes
reblogged via humansofnewyork
~ Sunday, June 15 ~
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humansofnewyork:

"Studying the brain is like working in a toy store. Nothing could be more fucking fun.""What do you think is the greatest weakness of the brain?""That’s a lousy question! I’m not answering it.""Why is it a lousy question?""What do you want me to say? Road rage? That we get pissed and shoot people? That the newest parts of our brain should have been in the oven a little longer? How’s that going to help you? If you ask a crappy question, you’ll never get a decent answer. You need to ask smaller questions— questions that give you a pathway to finding some pertinent information. The major advances in brain science don’t come from asking crappy questions like ‘What is Consciouness?’ They come from microanalysis. They come from discovering pertinent information at the cellular level."

humansofnewyork:

"Studying the brain is like working in a toy store. Nothing could be more fucking fun."
"What do you think is the greatest weakness of the brain?"
"That’s a lousy question! I’m not answering it."
"Why is it a lousy question?"
"What do you want me to say? Road rage? That we get pissed and shoot people? That the newest parts of our brain should have been in the oven a little longer? How’s that going to help you? If you ask a crappy question, you’ll never get a decent answer. You need to ask smaller questions— questions that give you a pathway to finding some pertinent information. The major advances in brain science don’t come from asking crappy questions like ‘What is Consciouness?’ They come from microanalysis. They come from discovering pertinent information at the cellular level."


9,364 notes
reblogged via humansofnewyork
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Happy Father’s Day with the Dads of DC Comics

dcwomenkickingass:

Today is Father’s Day so if you have a dad or someone you think of as a dad and they love you and you love them, I hope you have a good day. To celebrate I am once again offering my apologies to Dr. Seuss and offering a poem for the day.

(ahem)

There are dads who stealthy

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And dads who are wealthy
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Dads who give the evil eye
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And dads who are filled with pride
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Dads who will give you hell
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And dads who can teach a spell
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Some dads truly are the pits
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And some dads understand that sometimes all you can do is sit
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Some dads are faster than light
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And some dads always say what’s right
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Some dads come to their role quite late
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And some dad’s will do anything to change their child’s fate
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There dads who are protective
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And dads who are reflective
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And some dads who, after all, were detectives
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The dads of DC come in all sizes, big and small,
And then there are dads who aren’t fathers at all
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I miss my dad - give yours a hug for me! Have a great day!


1,936 notes
reblogged via dcwomenkickingass
~ Saturday, May 17 ~
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bobbycaputo:

National Guard Soldier Brings Back Artistic Photos from His Time in Afghanistan

Sean Huolihan isn’t the first soldier to spend some of his time overseas looking through a viewfinder instead of a rifle scope, but there’s a certain quality to the photos taken by the Iraq/Afghanistan Veteran that you don’t frequently find in images of war.

For 7+ years, Communications Section Chief Huolihan was a member of the Wisconsin National Guard, but his service took on a different dimension when he picked up a Nikon D90 and began taking pictures after a tour in Iraq. By the time he was deployed to Afghanistan a few years later, he had advanced to the point where he felt comfortable volunteering as the historian for the unit B 1-121FA HIMARS.

The images he came back with are more ‘artistic’ than you typically see. Pictures of rockets and machines of war are juxtaposed against silhouettes and star trails, making for a very interesting collection of photographs indeed.

(Continue Reading)


3,968 notes
reblogged via marcusto
~ Saturday, April 12 ~
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onceapunatwistedfairytale:

humansofnewyork:

"I teach fourth grade in Harlem.""What’s your greatest struggle as a teacher?""I worry a lot about the kids.""Why’s that?""Not all the kids. Just the ones that aren’t on the ‘college track.’ Many of them just don’t have a culture of expectation at home, and it’s hard work to lift yourself out of an underprivileged situation. I actually just finished going to a trombone recital for a former student of mine. I used to coach him in hockey on weekends. He’d practice with me from 4 AM to 6 AM. Then he’d go practice trombone from 8 to 10. He did all this just so he could get into a good high school. That’s what it takes, really. Hard to do without a culture of expectation."

This bothers me…
It is hard work to lift yourself out of an underprivileged situation.
The ones who aren’t on a college track in the fourth grade  isn’t necessarily indicative of a “culture” of a lack of expectation within the home…
But making that assumption because of kids not being on that track in elementary school….and being proud of attending recitals does contribute to the culture of the great white hope.
I work with underprivileged kids within Washington, DC and some of them don’t discuss college, or seem to be on that track. Most of them focus on WWE, instagram, the latest shoes, gossip in school…etc. School work just seems like a means to an end for SOME of them. At the same time, others do think about the future and obsess about getting one bad grade. However, it was a similar situation when I worked within the second best private school in Washington, DC.
I do agree, kids in a less than privileged situation have to work harder than others. However, to say there’s a lack of expectation within the homes, I think, is an inaccurate assumption. With ALL kids, some focus on academics/college, some focus on sports, some focus on the arts and some seem to have no focus at all, this including the fact that their parents are vocal about their academic expectations.
Its absolutely normal.
Not all kids, privileged; underprivileged; white; black; Asian; feet; no feet; half a finger; whatever, go to college…some make it some don’t. Some go to college, some drop out. Some graduate and do nothing more, some graduate and excel. Some don’t graduate and work for/run fortune 100 companies, some become bums.
The expectation is for your kids to do great things and excel in life, the reality is some will and some won’t …with or WITHOUT a college education. One isn’t indicative of the other.
In the end, in my personal opinion, going to college is such a litmus test of the privileged.
This coming from a young Afro-Caribbean American female college graduate from Brooklyn.
From my experience, I don’t know if passing that test proves anything but nothing at all.

onceapunatwistedfairytale:

humansofnewyork:

"I teach fourth grade in Harlem."
"What’s your greatest struggle as a teacher?"
"I worry a lot about the kids."
"Why’s that?"
"Not all the kids. Just the ones that aren’t on the ‘college track.’ Many of them just don’t have a culture of expectation at home, and it’s hard work to lift yourself out of an underprivileged situation. I actually just finished going to a trombone recital for a former student of mine. I used to coach him in hockey on weekends. He’d practice with me from 4 AM to 6 AM. Then he’d go practice trombone from 8 to 10. He did all this just so he could get into a good high school. That’s what it takes, really. Hard to do without a culture of expectation."

This bothers me…

It is hard work to lift yourself out of an underprivileged situation.

The ones who aren’t on a college track in the fourth grade  isn’t necessarily indicative of a “culture” of a lack of expectation within the home…

But making that assumption because of kids not being on that track in elementary school….and being proud of attending recitals does contribute to the culture of the great white hope.

I work with underprivileged kids within Washington, DC and some of them don’t discuss college, or seem to be on that track. Most of them focus on WWE, instagram, the latest shoes, gossip in school…etc. School work just seems like a means to an end for SOME of them. At the same time, others do think about the future and obsess about getting one bad grade. However, it was a similar situation when I worked within the second best private school in Washington, DC.

I do agree, kids in a less than privileged situation have to work harder than others. However, to say there’s a lack of expectation within the homes, I think, is an inaccurate assumption. With ALL kids, some focus on academics/college, some focus on sports, some focus on the arts and some seem to have no focus at all, this including the fact that their parents are vocal about their academic expectations.

Its absolutely normal.

Not all kids, privileged; underprivileged; white; black; Asian; feet; no feet; half a finger; whatever, go to college…some make it some don’t. Some go to college, some drop out. Some graduate and do nothing more, some graduate and excel. Some don’t graduate and work for/run fortune 100 companies, some become bums.

The expectation is for your kids to do great things and excel in life, the reality is some will and some won’t …with or WITHOUT a college education. One isn’t indicative of the other.

In the end, in my personal opinion, going to college is such a litmus test of the privileged.

This coming from a young Afro-Caribbean American female college graduate from Brooklyn.

From my experience, I don’t know if passing that test proves anything but nothing at all.


7,003 notes
reblogged via onceapunatwistedfairytale
~ Friday, April 4 ~
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theotakupen:

NEED

I have a set. 

(Source: pulmonaire)


183,698 notes
reblogged via gabzilla-z
~ Tuesday, April 1 ~
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kierongillen:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital
it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

I didn’t know this, and immediately sends me down a “WHY?” hole.

kierongillen:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital

it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

I didn’t know this, and immediately sends me down a “WHY?” hole.


239,163 notes
reblogged via kierongillen
~ Saturday, March 22 ~
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seikuya:

Mmmm omurice!

I posted the first one last year. Today someone replied : Damian looks like omurice. It’s actually quite funny because Damian sounds like rice in Chinese, so I drew it out. XD


559 notes
reblogged via seikuya
~ Friday, March 21 ~
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seikuya:

A Dog’s Dream
You know in our hearts, you never left, not even for one day.

seikuya:

A Dog’s Dream

You know in our hearts, you never left, not even for one day.


1,236 notes
reblogged via seikuya
~ Sunday, March 16 ~
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3 notes
reblogged via ruckawriter
~ Friday, March 7 ~
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beanclam:

This is the first time I’ve actually finished a Thor pic.

… my hundreds of messy sketches don’t count ^^; Very pleased with this one, prints incoming! I’m uploading it to my Society6 store right now.


7,151 notes
reblogged via gabzilla-z
~ Sunday, March 2 ~
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Sketchbook Assignment 1: Me vs. Me

image

1. For me, art is a permanent effort of exploration. 

Watch, listen, smell, taste, touch, feel, dream, ponder, question, analyze, wonder. 

Always curious of the objective world and the subjective mind; always push at their boundary to see if I could go further or deeper, or wonder if the boundary never actually exists at all. 

And then communicate with others and myself, see how much I can express it to them, or how much I actually understanding. 

How much more I can do. 

It’s the Tao of my life. 

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2. What’s interesting is that no one really tell me what art should be. 

Or at least no one really work on giving me some convincing or authoritative answer. 

My parents let me experiment; my summer school art teacher only taught a few basic skills, gave a topic, and let kids draw whatever they wanted; my friend happily accepted my housewarming gift (above). 

So in the end it becomes Me vs. Me. No one really gives me any direction or instruction. I’m my own direction and instruction. I’m my own boundary. And I will always love a new adventure. 

Tags: MOOC Live!: A History of Art for Artists Animators and Gamers
~ Thursday, February 27 ~
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humansofnewyork:

"I’m trying to find money for African start-ups. But I’m much too African for this cold weather.""What sort of start-ups?""Most of them combine agriculture and mobile technology.""How do those two things go together?""Africa is is an interesting case because it skipped the PC age and went straight to mobile. The economy is still largely based on agriculture, and farmers are beginning to use mobile technology to keep track of weather updates, market prices, and improved farming techniques."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m trying to find money for African start-ups. But I’m much too African for this cold weather."
"What sort of start-ups?"
"Most of them combine agriculture and mobile technology."
"How do those two things go together?"
"Africa is is an interesting case because it skipped the PC age and went straight to mobile. The economy is still largely based on agriculture, and farmers are beginning to use mobile technology to keep track of weather updates, market prices, and improved farming techniques."


4,196 notes
reblogged via humansofnewyork